Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/19/2020 in all areas

  1. I put a couple Seaga combos on a location yesterday... I think it will be a good fit for them...
    6 points
  2. First, read the install guide. https://www.cantaloupe.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ePort-G10-S_Quickstart-Install-guideVVXUD0101912-REV-I-singlepage-3.pdf If you have a spare validator cutout with the blanking plate it's a simple matter of taking an 11/32" deep socket, and removing the 4 nuts. Put the adapter plate on the reader and put it in where the blanking plate used to be. If not, you will have to drill. A couple considerations: 1. Not too high or low. I find somewhere just under 48" ideal. 2. I prefer to mount readers over POS windows, if at all possible. These are the little Plexiglas windows with a photo of some smiling dude eating chips or something, or that say "guranteed vend or your money back". This is because if the reader ever needs to come off, you can cover the holes easily with a new piece of Plexiglas and photo. 3. Keep in mind what I like to call "yeet syndrome". It's the phenomenon whereby some customers think that swiping a card involves some sort of drag race to see how fast they can swipe it. This results in the edge of the card dragging along the machine after it passes through the card reader, resulting in a bunch of scratches in whichever component is unlucky enough to be located under the card reader. As such, I try to avoid mounting readers above the display and keypad. 4. Wherever you choose to drill, make sure there is nothing behind it. If there is, make sure there is enough clearance between the door sheet metal and component for the mounting screws and for a cable to pass through. Of course, make sure you remove the component before drilling. 5. Before you connect or disconnect anything, make sure the machine is off. Also, do not power up the card reader without an antenna attached. 6. Before you drill, hook everything up, with antenna, and see if you can actually get a cell signal with the door closed and antenna in the proper spot. Patching holes sucks. 7. With all that out of the way, it's drilling time. Print the template, then align it and level it. Tape it to the machine in the desired location. Make sure its right side up. Use an automatic center punch to make a little divot at the center of each hole to be drilled. This will prevent the bit from wandering. Use a sharp bit of the correct size to make the 4 mounting holes. For the big center hole for the cable, use a step drill bit. Pilot the hole (drill a small hole), and enlarge it with the step bit. 8. Clean up the swarf (metal shavings). Clean up sharp edges. 9. Mount and connect. 10. Test.
    4 points
  3. Your understanding of locks and physical security is lacking, at best. There are two types of attack, destructive and non-destructive. Destructive attacks damage the lock or machine. Examples include drilling, cutting, and popping using impact. This is why the physical strength of a lock matters. And as such, material and design matter. A cheap ebay lock is usually soft brass. A Medeco is built out of more robust materials, and it has hardened steel pins in the face to resist a drilling attack. Non destructive attacks do not damage the lock or machine. This involves three different types of attack: unauthorized key, picking, or bypass. Unauthorized key is when someone else has a key to your machine. This can be a concern with cheap eBay or especially shipping locks, as they may only build a couple codes. The chances of someone else having your key is higher. A registered code means that you get assigned a unique code, which cuts down or eliminates copies of your key floating around out there. A company like LSI or Medeco go a step further, and use a unique key shape, and patent it. By doing this, they control key blanks, making it even harder for unauthorized copies to be made. Picking is self explanatory. Here, a high security lock will incoporate many security features. Tighter tolerances mean that a lock is harder to pick. Security pins add significantly to the difficulty of picking. For tubular locks, a premium product will use varying strength pins to prevent the cheap tubular lock picks from working. For disc detainer locks like Abloys, the unique nature requires specialty tools. And for Medecos, they use not only security pins that need to be set to the proper height like a standard key tumbler (house) lock, but also the pins need to be rotated to the correct angle by the key, which adds another dimension to the difficulty of picking. A good lock like a Medeco is extremely difficult to pick. Bypassing is similar to picking, but instead of manipulating pins, the goal is to find design flaws that can be exploited to quickly open a lock. Is the back of the keyway open? It might be vulnerable to having a long pick stuck inside and being used to directly pull the locking latch back. A quality lock should be well designed and should not have any flaws of this nature. A cheap lock might. At the end of the day, a quality lock is worth the money. And, you can always order keyed alike locks and new keys, as they are made to order.
    4 points
  4. The best thing about InOne boards is that you can mix micromech and MDB components. Its the only aftermarket board that does that. So you can still use your TRC-6000 mech and then an MDB validator (or not) and then still use a card reader which is MDB.
    3 points
  5. They send us a rebate check every quarter off Vistar products we buy. Nothing bad to say.
    3 points
  6. Wait, what? Cantaloupe has support? I know they have a support phone number but I’ve never actually got thru on it 😯
    3 points
  7. You are making me seem like I'm some sort of pervert. I was keeping that a secret.
    3 points
  8. 3 points
  9. Just do yourself a favor and bypass the ballast, remove the starter, and put in a direct wire LED bulb.
    3 points
  10. I'd say about 50% of the posts you make lead me to believe that you are actually just a troll. I'm not even joking.
    3 points
  11. Well...I think Canadians just deal with looneys and tooneys differently than we do. You guys count and spend them, we elect them into government offices.
    3 points
  12. Too much bread.
    3 points
  13. It could be your lock. I have locks that don't like certain machines. The nipple just doesn't fit right in the t-handle and they'll pop open, particularly if you move the door a bit like shaking the machine. So try another core first and then a completely different lock later. I had an AP 6600 that I scrapped a while back. Machine had seen better days but the locking bar was wore out so you could unlock it by simply pushing up on the door slightly. So try playing with the door too to see if you can make the handle pop open.
    3 points
  14. You should have called up NYcandyman. He'd gladly come by in his minivan and pick them up
    3 points
  15. He's not that angry. Wait until you meet AZVendor.
    3 points
  16. They may not have been able to keep up with demand and fuel/time costs ate all the profit. Combos require constant attention. If you decide to move forward, I would suggest at least trying to talk the location into drink only. Also, if the laundry is coin-op, set your vendor to "Force Vend" or all your quarters will end up in the laundry machines. You'll have a lot of $1 bills but no product sold.
    3 points
  17. A Single Price coin mech ( Mars TRC 6800H ) should not enable the DBV to accept (or even engage the transport motors in the DBV) without the lower tube sensors for at least Quarters and Nickels covered. If the DBV is enabled, the coin level should not be an issue. If the bill is accepting and spitting it out, that is failure to validate due to bill inserted incorrectly, sensor issues or just a picky DBV. Clean the upper and lower track sensors with alcohol (evaporates and is not corrosive to plastic), make sure your belts aren't so worn that they can't grip a bill without slipping. In MEI DBV's don't forget the "Cross channel sensors" as a single hair will make the unit believe it's being "strung" and will not accept.
    3 points
  18. So there is still a place for an old S-75 to do what it was best at...returning coins all day
    3 points
  19. If you choose to buy whatever this seller has on location do not pay for the Coke owned machine because he doesn't own it.
    3 points
  20. Make a donation to this forum and I'll send you a harness. Email me: gbruss<at>mmsalescompany<dot>com (enter the correct characters that are in <> ) Disclaimer: I have no personal connection to, or financial interest or investment in TFV. I just know some funds are needed right now.
    3 points
  21. Did you check to see the machine is not set to Free Vend? I would turn free vend on and off a couple times and then check it again. You may also want to do a RAM clear while you are at it.
    2 points
  22. If it's selectivend, then it should be a brand under wittern/USI (aka fawn, federal, and others). Wittern and USI are good, and so are their other brands... usually. Sometimes though they make combos that appear to be throwaway machines like the ones sam's club usually sells. I think they don't necessarily support these specific models like their mainstream stuff from reputable distributors. Because of that, it depends on the model number.
    2 points
  23. Glad to help, this is how everybody learns. There's a donation button on the home page. Cheers!
    2 points
  24. You ate very welcome! I have found your channel really helpful; both with general vending tips and also for pointers with my Dixie Narco 276e machine. Thank you for taking the time and effort to make the videos, it is appreciated.
    2 points
  25. Probably not, the older cabinets for satellite units were serpentine, but that is probably a six column stack, 3 front and 3 rear. Each column can hold about 2 cases of cans or 1 of bottles. Nice capacity for it's size actually. Just sold one not as nice looking as that one. I agree with your idea on the price offer.
    2 points
  26. If you have some other AP 66/7600s that haven’t been updated keep them as spares. Otherwise eBay the suckers.
    2 points
  27. Keep your equipment clean and operational. People are leary of purchasing food or drinks from a machine that is dirty or looks "beat up from the feet up".
    2 points
  28. Please don't take this personal, I love you Mike! But I'm pretty sure the shorted solenoid is rare. Even so, what's worse? A machine that makes itself unusable for a usually harmless coin jam (a potential $150 savings if it's a shorted solenoid) or several days of lost sales at a time (not knowing about it for days) and a potentially lost account? I'd rather deal with the rare damages done by shorted solenoids. Maybe I'm on the minority in this but it's odd to note that this problem only seems to exist in the v21 and it's rare that I have to replace a board or anything due to a faulty coin mech. I think vendo should conduct a poll. I'd rather pay for the repairs when they happen rather than have an unusable machine. Now, if the card reader worked, I can see it making sense but everything gets disabled when this even happens. No payment option at all.
    2 points
  29. To take the words out of AZ’s mouth, can’t you guys just get your own locations and do your own advertising? It’s a damn scam. Get with it! Ps this thread was started almost 2 years ago. Maybe start your own new one.
    2 points
  30. I had a sneaky thief skimming cash out of a couple beverage machines we had in an apartment complex - wasn't tracking the cash/inventory close at the account but for months, things seemed off.... Finally came in for service one week and found one of the locks screwed up - it was offset and would not accept the key. This time both machines were completely cleaned out, suspect he/she was using a tubular pick and finally screwed it up and couldn't get it back to center. Fixed that with T-handle hasp covers and Abloy puck locks - no problems since
    2 points
  31. Having machines keyed alike as you already do is a good choice, but having a private key is even better. I agree with Chris that you probably have a worn lock or latch on that machine, and swapping cores may solve the problem for now. But investing in a registered lock and key is a good long term decision. I have Medeco, and about once a year I find that those locks have prevented some ne'er-do-well from breaking into machines that I thought were in good safe locations. Last instance a bank of three machines in a factory breakroom where all three cores were damaged and had to be replaced, but the visitors did not get into any of the machines. It's a worthwhile investment.
    2 points
  32. 50% of annual sales is a good starting point. Adjust from there for other factors like newer or very old equipment, etc.
    2 points
  33. It's easier to just pull the battery for 3 minutes. The board will default the selections to 1 to 1. All you need to do after that is set the price(s)
    2 points
  34. One of the most validating feelings in the world is being liked by a friend's pet who "doesn't like ANYONE!"
    2 points
  35. People get a lot more hung up over a 10c fee than a 25c price increase.
    2 points
  36. Most people here are going to tell you to go with the two-tier pricing. I don't do that mostly for the reason you mentioned - discouraging people from using cards. I have spoken to too many customers who complained about other vendor's markup to think customers don't notice or care. In reality, you can raise all of your pricing in stages to help cover the fees and customers will accept the higher prices much better than two tier. Yep, that fee hurts because you see it as an added expense, and it is. But as your cashless sales increase you will also save time in the count room, and the cashless sales can't be lost or stolen between the machine and the bank.
    2 points
  37. Apple leisure posted yesterday about wanting to unload some equipment. Maybe PM him?
    2 points
  38. Oh boy, here we go. The 5 dirty words "..best type of combo machine".
    2 points
  39. The TRC6010 you installed is likely burned out because you unknowingly supplied it with 110 VDC. If it didn't pop when you plugged it in, it will as soon as an acceptor or payout solenoid fires. That issue was pretty common at the time and is why the 15 pin versions of coin mechs were created. Below is an overview of those basic options. Mars TRC6000 or Coinco 9300L = 110 VDC - 12 pin harness Mars TRC6010 or Coinco 9302L = 24 VDC - 12 pin harness Mars TRC6010XV or Coinco 9302LF = 24 VDC - 15 pin harness
    2 points
  40. I'm itching to read Randy's response.
    2 points
  41. Try to program the cassette. Press <menu> then <cassette> then D C A, then <accept> I'm assuming the unseen tube E is nickels, making it a DCA setup. If that doesn't work, send for repair
    2 points
  42. I have 2x25 wheels for both NW & Oak (also fitting A&A/Eagle. etc). If anyone is interested in giving it a shot, I'd sell 5 for $15 plus $5 shipping (sorry, selling onsies/twosies not the worth the effort). A friendly competitor I just bought out (who'd been in the business 27 years, is sharp as hell & recently retired) had been using 2x25 almost exclusively last few years. We spoke at length about his thought process. He says he'd done the math, & even in locations w/o competition, his overall sales increased near 20%- more than paying for the extra product. I remain skeptical there but absolutely agree that in locations where you have competition it's a no brainer. We are in an impulse business- mom gives her 8 year old a quarter, it ain't rocket science as to which machine he gravitates toward.
    2 points
  43. No, it reads them in any orientation, also sorts and can be used to face and orient the bills. I had a Semacon and would run each machine's take for count, then run the entire batch for sorting, orientation and banding. Cut my counting time by more than half. Also have a Jetsort coin counter and between the two counting is a breeze.....
    2 points
  44. People won't buy gumballs en masse for 50 cents. I have been doing the 2 for 25 for years in locations with competition or slow sales with great success and I haven't had issues with profitability running gumballs in this manner. If I can take a machine that is doing $3 per cycle and bump it to $15 or $20 bucks per cycle while still making 70-80 percent gross profit I think that's a no brainer. Like I said above.....to each his own. I will add this piece of advice.....Bulk vending isn't going to get any easier going forward so don't be afraid to experiment with different setups especially when the cost of the experiment is negligible. Locations are getting harder and harder to come by so having a cost effective competitive edge never hurts.
    2 points
  45. The use of lead paint was banned in 1971 and I have never heard anyone convey that lead paint was ever used on vending machines even before that. Oak was always an industry leader and one of the best selling machines since 1948 so if there was ever a lead issue with the paint I am guessing I would have heard about it in the last 20 years. I don't think you have anything to worry about. If you are going to sand it and are still concerned then use a respirator and do it in an open, well ventilated area (like outside in the yard). Here is a link to a story on this website that gives a little history about Oak Manufacturing:
    2 points
  46. I dropped the ball, and didn't get out my Happy Thanksgiving message this year. (And my happy Thursday for everyone outside of the US.)
    2 points
  47. Yeah,just tell them you'd like to redeem your rewards for cash.
    2 points
  48. Yep, just replace it. Vendors Exchange, 40 bucks. Like AZ said get new buttons too. Around .30 each so like 7 bucks a set. Extra credit, get a new coin insert trim and led lens and freshen it up. Tip for when you are replacing the keypad, take some painters tape and put it across the front of the select panel. Drop the keys in, so the faces stick to the tape. Then use some Scotch tape to secure the keypad to the select panel. After you screw it all in the tape on the keypad is hidden on the back and you can just peel the painters tape off.
    2 points
  49. To me, a company that changes names for no apparent reason is one to stay away from. Mergers, I get. Change of ownership, sure. But usually, a seemingly random name change signals to me that they have a reputation that they are trying to get away from. Think about it, a company with a good reputation hesitates to change its name, just because they know customers associate the name with how good their company is. For a bad company. it's just the opposite. And frankly, posting positive reviews ostensibly written by satisfied customers is an insult to the intelligence of the members of this board.
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...