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Vendo Mike

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Everything posted by Vendo Mike

  1. Sure Given a serial number, I can find out if we have something to fit. We currently only produce the deck that fits 621/721/821 but can retrofit to older equipment. You might try a local distributor for one as you might see an outrageous lead time right now from my parts dept. SandenVendo (800) 344-7216 Refer deck, R134a - V21 - 1192401-1
  2. Fair enough. How do you ensure that you've removed condensibles (sp?) from the system? If the leak is on a suction line, it's pretty likely you have pulled moisture into the system.
  3. My point regarding the oil filter is that, in order to add an actual service stem w/ shrader valve, you have to recover the freon,, replace the drier/filter, pull a vacuum, pressure check and then recharge. By the time you're to this point, finding a leak is generally fairly easy. Not repairing a leak can cause issues like continuing to leak freon into someone's office or breakroom (vending locations generally are not a fan of this) as well as the chance of pulling moisture into your refrigeration system which will cause clogs and other issues or shorten the life of the compressor. Piercing access valves (aka saddle valves) are not meant to stay on any piece of equipment as a permanent means of access. They are known to be a source of leaks. Every licensed refrig tech knows this. If a tech wants to add a saddle valve to a system and just squirt some freon in, there is little doubt that he/she will be back to squirt some more in down the road. That is one way to get a repeat customer, but not a happy one. Especially when you're charging them again for freon that should not have leaked back out. I contend that the cheaper repair is often not the most logical one but I totally understand that sometimes an operator only has enough capital for the cheap fix, but they will very likely have the same issue or worse and they will have to face it at some point. Sometimes your hands are tied. If I were only working on my own equipment and had an issue like this, I might go the easy route and just know that I'm going to be babysitting that unit until I resolve to repair it correctly: however, working on someone else's equipment, you have to try to get it done right the first time.
  4. From a cost standpoint, I understand that often it's cheaper in the short-term to kick the can down the road. It's also cheaper not to replace your oil filter when changing the oil on your vehicle but that do If a system is leaking, the freon will need to be recharged again, there are no other options. When I got my refrigeration cert, we were warned in no uncertain terms that refilling a leaking system without repairing the leak is the same a knowingly venting freon into the atmosphere and subject to very stiff penalties including fines and voiding the certificate. obviously, this operator isn't held to those standards and can say " I didn't know". AZ - In reading your posts, I most respect your tendency to urge people to do a job right the first time. Respectfully, in this instance, you seem to lean more to taking the less expensive route and hoping the leak goes away (we both know they don't). While it will save a little cost a little time in labor today, I don't see how this leads to anything but another service call for the same issue in the coming days, weeks or months. The operator will end up paying as much or more once the unit is finally either repaired or replaced.
  5. If the condenser fan was stuck, it's possible that the compressor pump failed before you got it. If the pump was functional and system charged, the condensing unit, (pump and coil) should get pretty warm and the evaporator coil should begin to cool. With no fans pulling air across the evap coil, it should freeze up within a couple of minutes. If the pump isn't engaging or the freon level is low, you won't be able to feel any change in temp on either coil. I wouldn't worry much about the door seal before getting the refer system worked out. You will likely need the help of a licensed, refrigeration tech for this repair.
  6. When you find a tech, If they say they're simply going to "top it off", find another tech. Any tech worth their salt will locate and repair a leak before adding refrigerant to the system. Leaks don't fix themselves and any unit with a leak needs to be recovered, vacuumed, leak repaired, filter/drier replaced and recharged. Otherwise you will be paying them to recharge it again (or worse ) in the near future.
  7. If your vend motors test ok and selections are ok and the unit reads "sold out". I would check the sold-out paddle harness and StS settings. If there are no motors assigned to selection buttons, your unit will read "sold out" and not accept money.
  8. The transformer for a 220VAC supply (many countries in Central/South America ) should step down from 220 VAC to 24 VAC.
  9. Thanks for the info Ethan. I talk to Randy at Continental from time to time. I will bring up coffee again and see where it goes.
  10. If they were refurbed mechs, you might ask your service center if they tune for Canadian coinage. If the work was done in the US and Canadian coins weren't specified, they may not have been tested for loonies
  11. Sorry, misunderstood the situation. If credit is being established but cancelled before that motor completes a vend, start looking closely at the wiring to the vend relay as well as the trailing switches on that and each of the other motors. Unless it's been done in the recent past, you might consider replacing all of the switch clusters on those motors. They're inexpensive and can be the source of a lot of headaches. As you work through them, you may find some that aren't plugged in completely/correctly.
  12. That depends on the tech that you chose. If you can trust the tech and his/her work, I would say that replacing the pump should save you some money and your unit SHOULD be good to go as long as the new pump lasts. If you're shooting in the dark with respect to technicians, I would spend the extra and purchase a new deck. Later, you can have the old deck repaired. This gives you a chance to try out a tech and begin to establish a relationship without having your equipment hanging in the balance and give yourself a backup deck for the next time this comes up.
  13. Respectfully, I think you're trying to fix something that is part of the original design of the machine. There really is not a "problem" to fix. The button simply has to be held a little longer than one may expect. Consumers have gotten accustomed to that type of thing over the 30+ years that machine has been in the market so there really isn't a reason to start changing things now.
  14. I think the motor turned slightly but the trailing switch still isn't in the notch.
  15. After making sure your GFCi is good, start by removing all of the plugs from the power box and supply power to it alone. If the GFCi trips at that point, you have a short in the box (chewed wiring or something). If it's still running, power down, reinstall one circuit at a time (refer, lights, board power) until you find what is the root of the short and then repair that. Or look for where the smoke is coming out
  16. This circuit requires the selection button to be held to provide power to the motor until the trailing switch to falls into the notch on the cam. Once that happens, the motor will have continuous power and will rotate until the leading switch falls into the next notch. This resets the vend relay and re-enables the coin mech for another vend. Unfortunately, this simply means that you have to hold the button a bit longer than you'd expect.
  17. If your board lets you into Service mode for CPO, there should be nothing preventing moving forward through the programming. Are you waiting a long time to press the mode button again to proceed through the menus? S. Thomas is long out of the vending business but I think that VE, Capital or Changer Svcs may have some boards.
  18. Our primary obstacle is that they are not UL rated for outdoors. Controller portion of the cabinets are not insulated from water ingress.
  19. Local distributors may have one for you. The door gasket is not a standard fridge seal. Our parts line is 800-344-7216. George can let you know if we have any left in stock. I believe they are/were discontinued but could be mistaken.
  20. It sounds as if your StoS (Space to Sales) is not programmed correctly.
  21. How was your first week in the wonderful world of vending?
  22. Being new to vending, I would like to offer a word of advise. Food machines are generally only offered to an account as a means of getting your snack and drink machines in the account. In many cases, a good location for food machines break even once service and wasted product are taken into account. If the account requires a cold food program, you would be wise to keep the expense of everything tied to that line (i.e, machine, product, maintenance costs) to a minimum so that your snack and drinks stand a chance to keep you in the black.
  23. I'm rubbing a couple of crystals together and burning a sage brush. I am getting visions of a DN501 with a blown fuse. Am I close? If this works, I'm getting a lotto ticket.
  24. One way to check the door seal is to wipe grease on it. Close the door until sealed and then reopen. From there, check to see if the grease transferred to the cabinet seal. IF there are gaps, they should show up. Based solely on the age of those cabinets, it's not hard to believe that that door gasket may be in order.
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