Jump to content

Machine Types - Newbie Questions


VendingInCali
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello All,

I'm new to the vending business and I was hoping to answer some simple questions about machine types.  At this point, I'm trying to decide if I want to sell toys or candy/gumballs (or a combo).  Since I will be experimenting with product and price points, I'm looking for a machine with flexibility. 

Obviously, there are many types of vending machines from different vendors.  I have a few questions....  in most cases are machines flexible (allowing both toys and candy/gum?  Or, do I need to buy separate machines for candy and toys?  In terms of price points, are machines universal or do they have limits (for example, .$50 per purchase).  Anyone have any recommendations for vending machines where I can combine toys and candy?

Thanks in advance

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are looking for a machine that can vend candy, gum, and 1.1 capsels then you can go with a north western 60, or many of such machines. I would not start with 2" toys unless you plan to rack. Racking would demand high quality location and I would avoid at this point. Going with the 60 and triple stand may suit your needs. You can get them to accept .25 or .50.

This will allow you to try locations out for toys, candy and such. I like your idea and I wish you luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also think the Northwestern machine is good.  I have mostly Beaver machines (pretty pricey).  Many of the better machines will have interchangable wheels for candy, gumballs, and or toys.  Really watch about getting machines with plastic mechanisms and internal parts.  You want the hardest working parts of the machines to be metal or you'll run into constant headaches.

Most of the better machines will allow you to change out your coin mechanisms from .25 to .50 or higher.  I'm in the process of doing this now for my toy capsule machines.  Product has gone up too much!

Best of luck.

Mark

PS: Feel free to browse my site vendingarticles.net for ideas on vending startups.  I cover a lot of questions related on how to start a vending business and give tips for increasing cashflow.  There is also a section on buying machines.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First decide what type of bulk vendor you want to be. Comission, charity, or combination.

Vending machines are tools and you use different tools for different applications. Northwesterns are used by a majority of comission vendors. The  reasons for that are 1. they are very reliable, 2. they hold a lot of product.

Charity vending is different, there is no consensus on what equipment to use. Singles, doubles, triples, plastic machines, metal machines, Chinese machines, American machines- all are used in charity vending to varying degrees of success.

The three biggest factors in choosing a charity vendor are 1. price, 2. quality/reliability, 3. flexability.

1. Price, Charity locations typically don't do large dollar volumes, say $7 to $15 a month, so they won't support an expensive machine. You want something that pays for itself quickly and then starts making you money.

2. Quality/reliability, every time a machine breaks it costs you lost sales, time, gas (if you have to make a repair call), and parts to fix. Suffice it to say, you dont want to be doing too much of this.

3. Flexability, For me this means matching the equipments' capabilities to the locations performance.Whatever number of products that sell above your minimum level for continued operation is the number of heads that you want at that particular location.That could be one, two, or more.

For charity locations you don't want a machine that holds so much product that it gets old before its sold.

So having said all that my opinion is that the Oak Vista 300 at $40.50 a head is the best all around charity vendor. If you have a higher volume location and need more capacity then just replace the Vista 300 head with a Vista Cabinet head and add an expander for even more capacity.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First decide what type of bulk vendor you want to be. Comission, charity, or combination.

Vending machines are tools and you use different tools for different applications. Northwesterns are used by a majority of comission vendors. The  reasons for that are 1. they are very reliable, 2. they hold a lot of product.

Charity vending is different, there is no consensus on what equipment to use. Singles, doubles, triples, plastic machines, metal machines, Chinese machines, American machines- all are used in charity vending to varying degrees of success.

The three biggest factors in choosing a charity vendor are 1. price, 2. quality/reliability, 3. flexability.

1. Price, Charity locations typically don't do large dollar volumes, say $7 to $15 a month, so they won't support an expensive machine. You want something that pays for itself quickly and then starts making you money.

2. Quality/reliability, every time a machine breaks it costs you lost sales, time, gas (if you have to make a repair call), and parts to fix. Suffice it to say, you dont want to be doing too much of this.

3. Flexability, For me this means matching the equipments' capabilities to the locations performance.Whatever number of products that sell above your minimum level for continued operation is the number of heads that you want at that particular location.That could be one, two, or more.

For charity locations you don't want a machine that holds so much product that it gets old before its sold.

So having said all that my opinion is that the Oak Vista 300 at $40.50 a head is the best all around charity vendor. If you have a higher volume location and need more capacity then just replace the Vista 300 head with a Vista Cabinet head and add an expander for even more capacity.

 

WOW

Nicely said and put together. While some may not agree with machines, I don't think anyone could/would argue your statement. Well done and very informitive. This should be a sticky!

VOTE MADE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom though I agree with underlining thought of your post. I cannot really agree that there is a difference in charity and commission accounts. (at least not in the sense that there is justification for a different machine)

It is probably more important for charity accounts to be reliable then commission as the "landlord" is not getting a piece of the action. I have read many posts were people lose accounts here on vendiscuss with there charity route, in 1 years time I have lost one location out of 70 to a much larger commission driven vendor (all of Ontario).

Granted I'm in a different geographic area, but I still see those abandoned vendstars were the route operator gave up due to whatever. (in most cases I can tell the coin mech went out)

I concur that most commission racks are Beavers or Northwesterns, but also most of them are out of the States. I have also seen others that were not, but what they all do have in common is that they are single head design to allow for different sizes.

The problem or common theme with charity is everybody wants to start as cheap as possible and with limit knowledge does not see the beifit of starting out with better equipment. Maybe I'm bias as I'm a mechanic and know better tools will help you make more money.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some other considerations are theft, vandalism and grungy environments. Singles and doubles have a higher tendency to get stolen than a rack setup. I had a number of smash-and-grabs from crack heads ruin some nice machines. You also don't want to put an expensive brand-new machine in dirty automotive or manufacturing locations.  In those cases cost would matter.

Having said that, I still use only NW and try get deals on used machines. I do see both points of view on this. As far as Oaks go, there are some rack vendors who swear by them.

Jax

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...