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What to do when questioned?


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I think I made  a huge mistake.  I put in a lollipop box at a at dealership. Some of the people also know me from my local business.  It was doing fairly well in the month that I had it. approx. 25 bucks . The folks seemed pretty friendly and were glad it was involved with nccs.   I SERVICED IT  the other day and about 6 employees were all girlling me about it. Asking if they get a commission 'jokingly poosibly". One specific question they asked me is if every penny in the box goes directly in the charity.  I told them the tuth that I pay for the boxes and a fee for the stickers which come out to approximately 40 percent of what it takes in and that I make a extremely small profit minus expsnes and theft. After being grilled  and almost bullied. I  told them politely that the small amount of money I do make comes out to much less then minium wage . I apologized that its not orking out and agreed to take out my stand.   I  got called a scam artist , told I should be ashamed of myself and that they would never shop in my store again. I  really got taken aback.    Was I stupid in being honest?

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No, you were being honest and if they are shallow enough to think all of your money should go to someone else then they aren't too bright. Since these are probably not customers you want to deal with in your store I'd tell them to F off.

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That's my biggest pet peeve with the general public. If you worked for the charity and got a salary they'd be ok, but if you work with the charity and only pay a monthly fee people get upset. I'm always honest too, tho I never give figures because people can't see the big picture. I figure if I'm honest and can't keep a location, I don't want it. And if I lost all my locations being honest, I'd change my business model.

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I also am leery of people asking me specifics about the money from my boxes.    What AMD Snacks says is a great point, in that people who get a salary from working for a charity would never get questioned, yet we do.   So would it be so bad to liken the little money we profit off of a box to be considered a small compensatory "wage"?  Would it be dishonest to explain (if questioned) that we make a small wage from working for the charity?  Isn't that what we are in essence doing?  We put out time, gas, supplies, maintenance into these boxes and after hoping there is minimal theft, get some money for our efforts. 

I know this topic has been brought up on this forum before, but I am interested to hear others' experiences and opinions. 

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I also am leery of people asking me specifics about the money from my boxes.    What AMD Snacks says is a great point, in that people who get a salary from working for a charity would never get questioned, yet we do.   So would it be so bad to liken the little money we profit off of a box to be considered a small compensatory "wage"?  Would it be dishonest to explain (if questioned) that we make a small wage from working for the charity?  Isn't that what we are in essence doing?  We put out time, gas, supplies, maintenance into these boxes and after hoping there is minimal theft, get some money for our efforts. 

I know this topic has been brought up on this forum before, but I am interested to hear others' experiences and opinions. 


To me honesty is the best policy. I will literally lay everything out on the table. If they don't like it I move on to the next location.

Now on the same note, I'm not going to go out of my way to tell them everything without them asking. But, if they ask I will tell them.


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I'm thinking of making up pamphlets that say something to the effect that "a portion of the proceeds support the charity and thus far with your help we've been able to contribute x dollars so far to x charity"


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esThank you all for your responses.  Your opinions and insight made me  feel better about being involved in the business


You should never feel bad about it. Think about all the money that all of us have donated together. That made a huge impact. Don't let anybody who doesn't quite understand it get you down. You are doing something to help.

That's more than a lot of people can say.


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I think I made  a huge mistake.  I put in a lollipop box at a at dealership. Some of the people also know me from my local business.  It was doing fairly well in the month that I had it. approx. 25 bucks . The folks seemed pretty friendly and were glad it was involved with nccs.   I SERVICED IT  the other day and about 6 employees were all girlling me about it. Asking if they get a commission 'jokingly poosibly". One specific question they asked me is if every penny in the box goes directly in the charity.  I told them the tuth that I pay for the boxes and a fee for the stickers which come out to approximately 40 percent of what it takes in and that I make a extremely small profit minus expsnes and theft. After being grilled  and almost bullied. I  told them politely that the small amount of money I do make comes out to much less then minium wage . I apologized that its not orking out and agreed to take out my stand.   I  got called a scam artist , told I should be ashamed of myself and that they would never shop in my store again. I  really got taken aback.    Was I stupid in being honest?


If your dealing with lollipop boxes. Do you switch them out like honor boxes? Or fill each individual one? If you switch them out and leave... Always act like you're in a hurry. If they start harassing you about nccs. Just let them know that nccs gets their money... Or else they take you to court. Businesses are creeps.. If you let them have the upper hand, they will find a way to get rid of you. You work for nccs... Questions?:huh: Call the number on the sticker. Let nccs talk for you. These lazy s.o.b.'s will not pick up the phone. They don't have time. Case closed!

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My comment would have been in a lite hearted joking manner  "hey, that is above my pay grade, do you want their number to ask?"  Then I would give it to them.

No one has the right to grill you on your work.


That's right pop lady! There is a phone number on the sticker. They won't pick it up...99 percent of the time. People need to let the charity defend itself.

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On 6/19/2017 at 11:34 PM, rebelwithoutaclue said:

I think I made  a huge mistake.  I put in a lollipop box at a at dealership. Some of the people also know me from my local business.  It was doing fairly well in the month that I had it. approx. 25 bucks . The folks seemed pretty friendly and were glad it was involved with nccs.   I SERVICED IT  the other day and about 6 employees were all girlling me about it. Asking if they get a commission 'jokingly poosibly". One specific question they asked me is if every penny in the box goes directly in the charity.  I told them the tuth that I pay for the boxes and a fee for the stickers which come out to approximately 40 percent of what it takes in and that I make a extremely small profit minus expsnes and theft. After being grilled  and almost bullied. I  told them politely that the small amount of money I do make comes out to much less then minium wage . I apologized that its not orking out and agreed to take out my stand.   I  got called a scam artist , told I should be ashamed of myself and that they would never shop in my store again. I  really got taken aback.    Was I stupid in being honest?

   The business owners who allow me to place charity equipment in there stores really do have the right to question me on the authenticity of the charity I have partnered with and I welcome their questions.  The key is to be prepared for questions. Educate yourself on the charity you use so if people ask questions you can confidently answer them accurately and succinctly. The problems start when you are not prepared. When you become evasive or act like you don't know what to say then people become suspicious. I have used the NCCS for years because they are a verifiable charity with a very good website that explains clearly what their mission is and how the money is spent. The NCCS states on their labels that they get a fee from the vendor regardless of sales and it is also clearly stated on their website. I explain to potential customers that the charity gets $1.00 per month per location regardless of sales. If they act like that isn't much I explain that the more machines (in this case boxes) I have out the better the charity does so if I have 500 machines/boxes out the NCCS gets $500.00 per month ($6000.00 per year) which is a very nice chunk of change for any charity. Most people understand that concept. This charity has helped me get into many corporate locations because I can fax or give them my contract, show proof that I pay the charity, give them the charity website and encourage them to call the charity to verify that I am in good standing with them. As far as I am concerned this is an excellent situation for all parties involved. Finally remember that as a charity operator we all have a responsibility to represent the charity in a positive manner. The last thing I want is for someone to think that the charity I am partnering with is not a legitimate organization because of something I said or did.

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   The business owners who allow me to place charity equipment in there stores really do have the right to question me on the authenticity of the charity I have partnered with and I welcome their questions.  The key is to be prepared for questions. Educate yourself on the charity you use so if people ask questions you can confidently answer them accurately and succinctly. The problems start when you are not prepared. When you become evasive or act like you don't know what to say then people become suspicious. I have used the NCCS for years because they are a verifiable charity with a very good website that explains clearly what their mission is and how the money is spent. The NCCS states on their labels that they get a fee from the vendor regardless of sales and it is also clearly stated on their website. I explain to potential customers that the charity gets $1.00 per month per location regardless of sales. If they act like that isn't much I explain that the more machines (in this case boxes) I have out the better the charity does so if I have 500 machines/boxes out the NCCS gets $500.00 per month ($6000.00 per year) which is a very nice chunk of change for any charity. Most people understand that concept. This charity has helped me get into many corporate locations because I can fax or give them my contract, show proof that I pay the charity, give them the charity website and encourage them to call the charity to verify that I am in good standing with them. As far as I am concerned this is an excellent situation for all parties involved. Finally remember that as a charity operator we all have a responsibility to represent the charity in a positive manner. The last thing I want is for someone to think that the charity I am partnering with is not a legitimate organization because of something I said or did.


I agree on not being evasive or act snobby..., or downright unaware of what is going on with the charity. But you are not the president of the company, and if someone is demanding a million answers from you then send them to Shirley p. She'll take care of all the intricate questions... Otherwise you will be backed in a corner.. But hey everyone has their own way of doing business. If you feel comfortable with doing that, then I can respect that. Me I want the charity to talk to people with questions... Maybe they can tell them some exciting news for some form of a cure for cancer... I wouldn't know that, but they would. I'm a vendor... Not a cancer doctor..I let the professionals talk.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Like Poplady said,  I tell them to contact the charity,  I don't like paperwork,  I just fill the machine. 

Shirley is great if she needs to handle it (nccs) others are to. For my machines though,  I'm with Ford on their sgk labels. Great program. 

Most of the vending charities have a pamphlet with the amount made and so on.  I would also buy the shirt,  Id, certificates,  and so on.  I spend the extra money and look as professional as possible.  That's key.  

I also give them a letter from the charity.  

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Like Poplady said,  I tell them to contact the charity,  I don't like paperwork,  I just fill the machine. 

Shirley is great if she needs to handle it (nccs) others are to. For my machines though,  I'm with Ford on their sgk labels. Great program. 

Most of the vending charities have a pamphlet with the amount made and so on.  I would also buy the shirt,  Id, certificates,  and so on.  I spend the extra money and look as professional as possible.  That's key.  

I also give them a letter from the charity.  


Here here! There's nothing wrong with that advice!!!

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     There really aren't many questions to answer. Know your charity's mission like with the NCCS, it directly helps family's pay immediate expenses such as travel and lodging during a child's treatment, and that will take you a long way. I primarily self locate when I have time or use a in person guy and I can tell you that knowing the charity's mission has garnered alot of locations for me. If someone asks a basic question like "What does the charity do?" and you respond "Call the charity if you have questions" then that is a great way to A). Never get a foot in the door or B). Get shown the door if you are already in there.

     Please realize that I am not reciting the charity's financials for the last 5 years or rattling off the names of all of the board of directors. Just basic, simple answers that any reasonable business owner may ask in regards to the charity. I am guessing the telemarketers that Rodney uses probably have rudimentary info on their scripts that tell a little bit about what the charity does. if not I would be surprised. Like I said before I encourage people to call Shirley or go to the website if they want to verify what I tell them. At the end of the day I want to be knowledgeable and in control regarding every aspect of my business and that means knowing who I am partnering with on my charity accounts. It's been my experience that giving quick, confident answers on EVERYTHING helps obtain and retain commission and charity customers. That said, everyone has their own way of doing business and I say more power to them. I was just sharing thoughts that may help avoid confrontations like the one described at the beginning of this thread. 


I usually do my sales on the phone. If you don't talk short and quick, then you lose them. Just giving the basics of the charity that is found in the pamphlet is usually sufficient. Candy machines could support the best causes on the planet, but if they don't have the room for the machine then it doesn't matter any information that you give them. They just don't have the room. I've had a lot of apologies for not being able to accommodate us.

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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

my response to this question is simple, honest, and effective : we pay a set amount to the company every month, whether the boxes sit in our warehouse, or are out being used. some months we make a dollar, some moths we have 20 boxes stolen, lose hundreds of dolars,  and our theft is usually over 50%. we pay for all the products out of our pocket, use our vehicles to shop, and deliver, we spend our own money on fuel, and spend our own time doing this. if youd like to see how much money the organization has rasied so far, please take a look at their website, listed on the box. 

 

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This discussion reminds me of oblivious people that get upset when they find out I make a profit, yet are shocked that I don't make something like 90% profit from my sales.  It's almost like.. once they find out the business makes ANY profit, they start mumbling about how they can get candy or soda at walmart for cheaper and how I shouldn't charge so much money... yet when they find out I am lucky to make 25% in the end, they then start to criticize why I would want to be in a business that doesn't seem worth the effort lol.  People just want to complain about stupid stuff.  That's why I hate offices.  I wear, many office personnel have nothing better to do.  I am glad that my accounts are mostly not like that.

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  • 2 weeks later...

well said chris. its kinda like people just want something to complain about. "oh, you MAKE MONEY doing this??? THATS NOT RIGHT!!" OR, "if you dont make anything, why would you do it? that doesnt seem like a very good business." i just roll with it. some days we make a few $$, some days we lose lots of $$$. 

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