Jump to content

On Caserri's new 1 location, 1 head, 1 product philosophy


Lucero
 Share

Recommended Posts

I was thinking about Steve's idea of cutting down to 1 product, 1 head per location concept.  It seems like better logic, more profit and better results over all to me at first blush, and I'd like to talk it out here to explore it fully.  I am going to make up a scenario here.  Let's say we have a location that does $12/mo on a single head, and $20 on a double.  Scenario will use Seaga Millenia machines from sam's club, a double head bracket from sam's club, and a pipe stand from amerivend.  The 12/20 #s assume net profit from gross candy cost and sales figures.

Location cost, 1 head:  $46.44 + $27 = $73.44

Location cost, 2 heads: $46.44 + $46.44 + $8.88 + $27 = $128.76

ROI, 1 head:  $144 / $73.44) = 196%

ROI, 2 heads: $240 / $128.76 = 186%

We can see here there is a benefit on the ROI of 10%.  Not too shabby.  Performance numbers were pulled out of the air of course, so please offer something more real-world if these aren't accurate, and I'll re run things.  Now, what we have left out here is of course the second head.  I wouldn't let the other head sit around on Steve's gameplan of course, and just looking at the 1 location configuration shows the 2 head coming out with almost $100 more per year, so let's look at 2 locations, 2 heads total.

Net, 2 heads, 2 locations: $288

Net, 2 heads, 1 location: $240

This is probably what sway's Steve here.  The $44/year for each additional location I secure, and place a single head in. So, the %10 or $44 dollars per year is the benefit, plus dealing with less product (although more locations).

Now here's my take on this, and Steve I'm trying to elicit your idea on this in particular, since you are just about at the limit(in my mind) of what a person can service on their own.  If I have 650 locations, and I have single heads at all of them...

Net, 650 heads, 650 locations: 650 * 144 = $93,600

Net, 1300 heads, 650 locations: 650 * 240 = $156,000

The additional cost of equipment: ($128.76 - $73.44) * 650 = $35,958

So my thinking is that the $35,958 cost of equipment buys you an extra $62,400, or an ROI of 173% on that $36k in equipment.

Basically my reasoning is that locations are finite, both in a literal sense from how many stores are 'local' enough to service, and in another, in how many an individual can service.  Even if you hire someone out, the same math applies, they can only do another 650 locations... so is it better to have them servicing 650 heads, or 1300?

I think in light of this, I'm willing to take a lower ROI, but ultimately maximize net by running extra heads at a location.  I would like to hear from you folks to hear what other factors you think will play in that I have not considered here, and if we end up with a different strategy than the one I suggest as a result.

-Lucero  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

dont have much time now, will revisit later.

you are way off on the # of machines that one person can run, unless it is someone very slow.

also look at an 8 week service cycle instead of 4.

it doesnt take long to run 40 singles

40 x 5 days aweek = 200 a week

800 machines a month on an 8 week cycle is 1600 machines

i dont have this many so give me a couple of years and ill let you know how it works out

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Think of it like this: Say you have 100 heads...

set-up 1

50 doubles, the first head avg.12, second head avg 5 so 17 gross

x 50= 850 gross

set-up 2

100 singles avg. 12 per head

x100= 1200 gross

Its about getting the most sales per equiptment (heads), instead of starting a location out with doubles you start with a single, if you have a really smoken location then you can upgrade. So, ideally, you are earning the max per head.

Now, of course, you need more locations.

There is no right or wrong in this, it comes down to personal preference, you can over  analyze this thing, its bulk vending not engineering, what you want is good equiptment and good locations other than that its up to you weather you want to run racks, doubles or singles or ?. People forget this sometimes in their quest to chase a quarter but it should be fun, the real question is; what would you like to run?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Think of it like this: Say you have 100 heads...

set-up 1

50 doubles, the first head avg.12, second head avg 5 so 17 gross

x 50= 850 gross

set-up 2

100 singles avg. 12 per head

x100= 1200 gross

Its about getting the most sales per equiptment (heads), instead of starting a location out with doubles you start with a single, if you have a really smoken location then you can upgrade. So, ideally, you are earning the max per head.

Now, of course, you need more locations.

There is no right or wrong in this, it comes down to personal preference, you can over  analyze this thing, its bulk vending not engineering, what you want is good equiptment and good locations other than that its up to you weather you want to run racks, doubles or singles or ?. People forget this sometimes in their quest to chase a quarter but it should be fun, the real question is; what would you like to run?

Thanks for offering your perspective, Jimbo.  I agree that on a per-head basis, clearly the single-head per location is the superior strategy.  However, I believe that our ultimate constraining factor is locations, not heads(when considering profitability).  Heads are effectively infinitely available.  While they do cost money, after just 10 or 11 heads, your business will buy you a single head setup per month.  There are only so many strongly profitable, local locations that any one of us have available.  Similarly, there are only so many locations that we can service with our time.  Even if locations are literally within a block or two of each other, it's more time effective to change out a head than it is to drive to a new location and then service a head.

                                

Using your math, I can now have the same locations as your second example, 100, with an average of $17 for my double, and I now come out with 1700 gross without upping my locations any.

If your objective with the business is fun, or if you need fun to be a central theme to avoid burnout (totally understand that one!), then asking 'what would I like to run?' would definitely be the question to ask.  For me however, it's 'what is the most efficient way to run my business?  How can I maximize profit while minimizing effort?'  Can you share your view on the subject from the perspective of my question?  I know the answer may not ultimately impact the way you run your business, but I am new to bulk vending, and would appreciate feedback from more experienced folks.

Thanks,

-Lucero

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like I said, theres no right or wrong, its whatever works for you.

Even guys who have been doing this years disagree on some of these points.

 

One thing I can say is this, you can service many more singles compared to doubles especially if you are running one product like gb and you can service many more doubles than you can racks. More heads and more selections take more time and that is what you are not taking into account. Is it worth the gas? run a 10 mile street with 20 locations vs 10 locations and you tell me.

'How to run your business efficiently while minimizing effort'...

Some guys say doing racks, netting $60 x 6 a day. ($360)

Some guys say doing doubles, netting $16 x 18 a day. ($288)

Some guys say doing singles running gb netting , $10x35 a day. ($350)

I say, its whatever you are more comfortable with running. Personally, I like doubles, thats me.

When you get to the point when you are doing this full time, you are driving alot, you are serviceing alot, jumping in and out. Blasting the ac. You have to have a certain passion for what you are doing to be successful. We are providing a service and a product and at the same time we are making money.

My suggestion, and its only a suggestion, is put out 12-15 singles and run them, then try doubles and if you want racks, see what works for you.

Jimbo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like I said, theres no right or wrong, its whatever works for you.

Even guys who have been doing this years disagree on some of these points.

 

One thing I can say is this, you can service many more singles compared to doubles especially if you are running one product like gb and you can service many more doubles than you can racks. More heads and more selections take more time and that is what you are not taking into account. Is it worth the gas? run a 10 mile street with 20 locations vs 10 locations and you tell me.

'How to run your business efficiently while minimizing effort'...

Some guys say doing racks, netting $60 x 6 a day. ($360)

Some guys say doing doubles, netting $16 x 18 a day. ($288)

Some guys say doing singles running gb netting , $10x35 a day. ($350)

I say, its whatever you are more comfortable with running. Personally, I like doubles, thats me.

When you get to the point when you are doing this full time, you are driving alot, you are serviceing alot, jumping in and out. Blasting the ac. You have to have a certain passion for what you are doing to be successful. We are providing a service and a product and at the same time we are making money.

My suggestion, and its only a suggestion, is put out 12-15 singles and run them, then try doubles and if you want racks, see what works for you.

Jimbo

Jimbo,

So you are suggesting that a vendor can run 18 locations a day with doubles, but 35 locations a day with singles?  Can you help me understand why there would be such a huge difference in the number of locations serviced?  Since the number of heads are roughly the same (35/36), how is it the single head vendor can hit twice as many locations while servicing the same number of heads? Tricky!

-Lucero

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im saying yes, if you are running one product, say gumballs, that you fly thru them. You walk in with product, open machine, collect and fill, say hi, wipe it down and your off. I do both single and double and single is qucker. Much quicker...

In running doubles you have multiple products, Gumballs,  M&Mp, skittles, resses, runtz, hot tamale, mike & ike, 1" caps and super balls is what I run. You dont know whats low so you check, sometimes you have to make a product change, it just takes more time.

I dont know how many other guys service, but thats what I can do. Maybe you could do more, put some out and ket us know.

jimbo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im saying yes, if you are running one product, gumballs, that you fly thru them. You walk in with product, open machine, collect and fill, say hi, wipe it down and your off. I do both and its qucker. Much quicker...

In running doubles you have multiple products, Gumballs,  M&Mp, skittles, resses, runtz, hot tamale, mike & ike, 1" caps and super balls is what I run. You dont know whats low so you check, sometimes you have to make a product change, it just takes more time.

jimbo

You wouldn't check if it was gumballs?  Seems like if I run PMMs and Runts, I walk in the location with both, fill the machines, take the quarters, shake a hand and get out.  I understand M&Is are a little more time-intensive, but don't gumballs and PMMs and Runts pour from a bag at the same speed?  I can totally appreciate having one product reducing cost by ordering bigger in bulk, reducing management proccess by not having to think about which product to buy, but reducing service time?  I don't see it.  Still looks like more money in doubles for your 24 hours in the day...

-Lucero

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem is this. With other products, say mmp and skittles, how many bags do you bring in, two, three. I dont know how other guys do it but i go in, check, grab what i need from the van, sometimes I will bring a bag in but even then I usually walk back to the van for something, just the way it works. If you make a product change, may have to change settings, swap wheels, whatever. Im sure some guys service more doubles than me.

With gumball only I walk in with box of gb, coin bag, cleaning rag and spray, I pop the top, collect, do my fill and it is quicker.

The only thing I can say to you is try both and decide on one, or not, your choice, but that is how it works for me.

Jimbo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Holy Macrel!  That was a great back and forth by the two of you!  That's why this website rocks.  I learned a couple of things just reading what you guys talked about here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Holy Macrel!  That was a great back and forth by the two of you!  That's why this website rocks.  I learned a couple of things just reading what you guys talked about here.

Agreed, I will give a response when I have more time however I have added this thread to the "vending 101" tab at the top.

Thanks Lucero and all contributors, Good thought provoking thread.

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I completely understand the reasoning behind singles are quicker to service.  After all, your cutting the actual service time in half, however, if you have 10 doubles ( 20 heads) at 10 locations and another vendor has 20 single heads at 20 different locations, the amount of time saved servicing would be soaked up by added drive time to the additional locations.  And I would bet that his time would be more than the fellow with 10 doubles.  It takes 5, maybe 10 minutes at the max to service my machines.  ( I mainly have triples), but I walk in with everything I need.  I have a duffle bag that holds the candy for the location.  Wipes, and a few tools that I may need.  If I walk in, and there's still some product left, I go ahead and collect the money, but not fill up.  I'll wait until the next month and evaluate the condition, and possibly put the machine on a 8 week cycle instead if need be.

But who am I to have opinion on this matter...I'm new, and this has not actually happened to me yet.....I just went ahead and drew out a plan for the "just in cases".

1 Product is a good idea, if you can find what the population wants as a whole.....Gumballs is always a fave with the crowd, but EVERYONE HAS GUMBALLS.......And alot of my locations have a few machines on site from other vendors that offer only gumballs.  Then the customer has to choose between the machines.  In these locations that I have to compete with gumball only, I will still put gumballs in the middle of my triplevend, but have found that my actual candy sales are far, far, far better.  Instead of limiting to 1 candy only, limit yourself to the amount of candy offered.  In my triplevends, I try to offer something chocolate ( M&M's or reeses), gum, either gumballs or chiclets, and then some sweet, fruity candy, like runts or skittles.  That way, each machine offers the best of 3 worlds.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are running triples, all candy, menu is 4-5 items, yes, it would be alot quicker and you can run in with everything. When you start doing caps and superballs and more products it takes longer, caps and stuff is always changing out just to keep sales goin. As an example, nowadays I am fazing out reeses, going to mmp on those and Im changing alot of doubles where one side gb other side hard candy to gb, 1" caps or 27mm balls. Also changing in and out 2 for 1 wheels. On my route Im always running out for something, stand levelers, globes etc.

Im sure you could service more than 18 doubles, it was just an example I threw out, maybe 22-25, I dont know, it just depends on whats going on, do you have alot of product changes, how far your spread out, etc.

Personally, I like doing doubles, but I know other vendors who swear by singles, others who love triples and still others who swear by racks. I would say there are advantages and disadvantages to all of these types. To me it just comes down to what type of route you want to run.

Jimbo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have a single GB location that does really well, then you add a second product like skittles, you will prolly find that the GB intake will be less.  It's almost like you are competing with yourself.  If you are in a location with competition, I would not put in anything other than a single product.

If you have 1 location with a double that does $15 and $10, why not take the second head and put it in a second location and get $15 instead of $10?  That way you would be maximizing your profits per location.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are correct, separating a double that makes $15 on 1 side and $10 on the other ($25 total from one location) and making singles that offers 2 locations that bring in a total of $30 will give you an additonal $5 gross profit, but you are forgetting the additonal costs associated with having additional locations as well.  The time it takes to find a new location is worth something ( and if you use locators it definitely costs something), and the additional drive time costs something.  Not to mention that we all know that putting up a new machine somewhere is a gamble, there is no guarantee that it will produce $15, which means that there's a good chance that the new location for a single might only bring in $10/month, or even worst, which means you are making the same, if not worst than a double in one  profitable location, and you still have all the added costs.  If the single head does make only $10 and your not satisfied, you have to go through the whole ordeal again to find another location, only to gamble again.  

Now, I am not against separating a double if one side does good, and the other side doesn't make hardly anything, but before I make a move, I would experiment with other kinds of candy first.  This is all a matter of opinions, but I would much rather have doubles or triples with fewer locations, than  all singles with more locations.   With the  high gas prices, and the additional time spent locating, not to mention the added chore of additional bookkeeping ( which should also be considered),and the additional commisions or charity costs, the added profits will be easily dwindled away with the added indirect costs.

For instance, if you had 20 locations with doubles that brings you on average  $15/month on one side, and $10 on the other, your monthly gross sales would be $500, and then you broke them down and decided to have 40 locations with singles, and then let's say you actually did average $15 per head ( in which you probably won't, at least, it will take some additional moving) , you'll make $600.  That's $100 more per month for locating 20 additonal machines.  Now factor in drive time and service time....If  you can do 4 locations per hour, it's going to take you an additonal 5 hours of servicing or $20/ hour- factor in gas, additional commissions, charity, and about an added hour of book keeping and you'll only actually profit about $40-$50 more with all that added headache and work.

To each his own I guess, but I would much rather work less hours for more money per hour, than more hours, with more costs ( direct and indirect) for essentially the same money. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, in the novel I was writing in the previous post, I did forget to also mention that vending, as we all know is a numbers game.  If a person broke down all of there doubles that were not making equal or about equal profits, and went with singles to maximize ROI and actually worked hard to get additonal locations, if a few of these locations seemed to have promise, I would then try to put doubles in at least a few of them to add income from each location.....You would already have the doubles bracket, and would only need to spend $50 on an additional head.  By doing this, you could offset your added cost just a bit and make it a worthwhile venture.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm, I'm going to try a different tact, I feel like I've maybe introduced too much language and over complicated things.   Here's my idea:

How many locations do you have?

Would you make more money having 2 heads at every location you have, or would you make more money having 1 head at every location you have?

I'm hoping we can all agree 2, because if that's not the answer, I've gone horribly wroing in my thinking!

-Lucero

/Caserri!  Where are you? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, in the novel I was writing in the previous post, I did forget to also mention that vending, as we all know is a numbers game.  If a person broke down all of there doubles that were not making equal or about equal profits, and went with singles to maximize ROI and actually worked hard to get additonal locations, if a few of these locations seemed to have promise, I would then try to put doubles in at least a few of them to add income from each location.....You would already have the doubles bracket, and would only need to spend $50 on an additional head.  By doing this, you could offset your added cost just a bit and make it a worthwhile venture.

The beauty of splitting your doubles and finding new locations for them is that your business is nothing without locations.  What happens if you lose a double location?  If you have 40 locations with singles, you can always choose to revert and add second heads to increase your income.

You have to understand that I personally work on the single-head gumball model.  Additional product to me only spells out greater product costs and loss while not giving me the added ROI

Take racks for instance.  This is something that all rack vendors swear by.  However looking at it from my point of view, a rack is about $1000 worth of an investment, whereas a single gumball machine is less than $100.  And again, what happens to your income when you lose that rack location?

What about storage costs on all your additional product?  You have to keep it temperature controlled.  You have to service with greater frequency, thereby increasing your drive time and milage.  Your double head with candy will need to be serviced at a minimum of 4 weeks, sometimes sooner.  My gumball only route will only need to be serviced every 6-8 weeks, thereby reducing my drive time and milage.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are correct, separating a double that makes $15 on 1 side and $10 on the other ($25 total from one location) and making singles that offers 2 locations that bring in a total of $30 will give you an additonal $5 gross profit, but you are forgetting the additonal costs associated with having additional locations as well.  The time it takes to find a new location is worth something ( and if you use locators it definitely costs something), and the additional drive time costs something.  Not to mention that we all know that putting up a new machine somewhere is a gamble, there is no guarantee that it will produce $15, which means that there's a good chance that the new location for a single might only bring in $10/month, or even worst, which means you are making the same, if not worst than a double in one  profitable location, and you still have all the added costs.  If the single head does make only $10 and your not satisfied, you have to go through the whole ordeal again to find another location, only to gamble again.  

Now, I am not against separating a double if one side does good, and the other side doesn't make hardly anything, but before I make a move, I would experiment with other kinds of candy first.  This is all a matter of opinions, but I would much rather have doubles or triples with fewer locations, than  all singles with more locations.   With the  high gas prices, and the additional time spent locating, not to mention the added chore of additional bookkeeping ( which should also be considered),and the additional commisions or charity costs, the added profits will be easily dwindled away with the added indirect costs.

For instance, if you had 20 locations with doubles that brings you on average  $15/month on one side, and $10 on the other, your monthly gross sales would be $500, and then you broke them down and decided to have 40 locations with singles, and then let's say you actually did average $15 per head ( in which you probably won't, at least, it will take some additional moving) , you'll make $600.  That's $100 more per month for locating 20 additonal machines.  Now factor in drive time and service time....If  you can do 4 locations per hour, it's going to take you an additonal 5 hours of servicing or $20/ hour- factor in gas, additional commissions, charity, and about an added hour of book keeping and you'll only actually profit about $40-$50 more with all that added headache and work.

To each his own I guess, but I would much rather work less hours for more money per hour, than more hours, with more costs ( direct and indirect) for essentially the same money. 

well by the more heads = more money theory i guess we should all be running uturn 8 heads.

no wonder they get so much money from people

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...You have to service with greater frequency, thereby increasing your drive time and milage.  Your double head with candy will need to be serviced at a minimum of 4 weeks, sometimes sooner.  My gumball only route will only need to be serviced every 6-8 weeks, thereby reducing my drive time and milage.

 

I"m going to respectfully disagree on this point.  Success in bulk isn't just centered on location.  You also have to rely on repeat business, just like any other successful business.

If you have a head sit empty or nearly empty for a few days or weeks will reduce your repeat business (is it stale?  Will it vend?  Is it broken?  Will I get the M&M crumbs?).  More frequent servicing will keep your levels up, your product fresher, your repeat business higher and a more visible presence with the store owner/manager/staff.

28 day cycles...If you can't do all your locations in a day, schedule 2...or 3...or 4.....besides, it could buy you more time to locate more locations.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...You have to service with greater frequency, thereby increasing your drive time and milage.  Your double head with candy will need to be serviced at a minimum of 4 weeks, sometimes sooner.  My gumball only route will only need to be serviced every 6-8 weeks, thereby reducing my drive time and milage.

 

I"m going to respectfully disagree on this point.  Success in bulk isn't just centered on location.  You also have to rely on repeat business, just like any other successful business.

If you have a head sit empty or nearly empty for a few days or weeks will reduce your repeat business (is it stale?  Will it vend?  Is it broken?  Will I get the M&M crumbs?).  More frequent servicing will keep your levels up, your product fresher, your repeat business higher and a more visible presence with the store owner/manager/staff.

28 day cycles...If you can't do all your locations in a day, schedule 2...or 3...or 4.....besides, it could buy you more time to locate more locations.

It isn't worth it to me to service a location that has less than $20.  It's a waste of time and gas.  That means it may take 6-8 weeks to get to $20.  With gumballs, they arn't going to go stale and crack like what happens with candy.  Hot Tamales, Mike 'n Ikes and jelly beans have a tendancy to clump up and not vend.  M&M's will crack and most nuts will many times get worms/moths.  I will agree that even some gumballs will crack, but I've found that that happens with only certain brands and flavors.  The only thing that candy and gumballs have in common is that they may get ants.  But that can be fixed.

How fresh can your product really be?  I've purchased double bubble from sams and opened it that day, and it already looked bad.  I had to take it back.  The point is, whether it's sitting in your machine, or your warehouse or the store's warehouse, it's all been sitting for a long while.

It's a rare occasion that any of my machines will go empty during this time.  If that happens, I just put in a machine with bigger capacity.  True, I've had some locations that have been jammed.  But on those rare occasions, they don't warrant servicing my entire route any sooner.

You also have to look at it from the location owner's point of view.  If you service more frequently, and have less money in the box, then you will be giving less money to them per visit, if you are paying commission.  I think it's better to have fewer visits, and give the owner a bigger amount of cash in his hand when I service.  If I serviced every 28 days, I may only have $10 in some locations.  That equals about $2.00 that I hand over to the owner.  Big deal!  He may not see it as such a benefit to him anymore.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had locations with multiple product before, and it's always been a headache for me, for all the reasons I've listed above.  Also, even with the multiple products, the gumballs were always the biggest selling item.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

/Caserri!  Where are you? :)

 

I am here! I am just sitting back and watching the show!:D I absolutley love constructive, intelligent, civil debates.

I will say though that maybe my 1 head, 1 location theory was a little misunderstood. I am at a level in my vending career where I'm not looking to expand. At least with bulk. I'm looking for a way to maintain my current level of income while reducing stress and aggrivation. I am about 60% complete in the change over and have seen only a slight decrease in revenue. What I am getting in return is much more valuable to me. Ease of service, less worry about what to vend, less time spent at Sam's.

If you remember in my original post on this, I said I was going to either sell off, part out, or re-locate the odd ball heads. Well I have been parting out more often than not so I dont have the added expenses that vendingguy spoke of.

I will be taking it to the next level by turning my entire fleet into the same machine so servicing will be quicker than ever, simply swapping globes.

As stated before, I'm not recommending this to anyone. This is just my way of simplifying my operations.

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In reponse to the Luceros question "Would you make more money having 2 heads at every location you have, or would you make more money having 1 head at every location you have?"

this months answer would be 2 (slightly)

-but-

I think a more valid question (at least for me) would be if you have a 100 heads, would they make more as 50 doubles or 100 singles? and I would say singles.

These are an example from my route, percent is product cost.  First numbers gross sale, second is net sale. These are all on a 4 week cycle.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

double

tire store    s1    mmp    12.50    40% = 7.50

                   s2    m&i      9.00    22% = 7.02

                      net = 14.52

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

single

food mart    s1    gb    17.25    09%= 15.69

                      net = 15.69

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

double

deli         s1    gb    8.00    09%=  7.28

               s2    rees    10.50    19%=  8.50

                      net = 15.78

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

single

bar        s1    chic    21.25    20%=  17.00

                      net = 17.00

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Overall on my route

My doubles avg.$24 per mo. @ 20.5% COGS or $19.08

My singles avg. $21.50 per mo. @ 12% COGS or  $18.92, slightly lower but I can service more of them. I dont know exactly how many more, my stops are mixed, but I know I am out of a single location alot quicker. In addition,doubles, because of the products Im running (M&M peanut, reeses etc), there is more product spoilage with the doubles, especially in the hot summer months. (this is what dperry was getting at, product that does not last as long and spoils quicker and costs more) anyone running shelled candy for awhile knows what this is about.

So, doubles on my route gross 12% more but net is pretty close. BTW most of my singles were at one time doubles.  These numbers fluctuate, but stay close.

I do like doubles but for these reasons,

1-  Harder to steal, especially w/ the stand I use.

2-  I run alot of M&M Peanut and I like to have the other side to at least try and make up for the high cost.

3- In commission spots I want the other side to pay the rent.

4- I like to grab the floor space, I may want to go 4wy rack same width later on.

I would not say, however, that doubles nessicarily make more than singles and I would not say that triples make more either, in fact my triples are my worst preformers. There are many variables.

product cost, location, obviously some products take more time to maintain, clean, change etc.

Jimbo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...