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Locating: Scripts, Objections, Rebuttals, Success.


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Face2Face: Hello, my name is Mike, with the Vendingco vending company.  I am here to today locating small machines like this one in businesses in this area (picture of machine).  This machine helps

We spend so much time talking about products, machines and locators. We all seem to agree locations/locating is the most important thing. But how often do we really help each other with how to locate

I just wanted to let everyone know that I have converted most of the great information in this thread into a printable download. Feel free to download the 10 page PDF and print it out so you can brush

LOL, thanks Kelly!  Gosh you make me laugh!  No toys, Lurts, just single-head gumball machines with commission.  I'm sticking with them and the dozen other triple-heads for now until I relocate next year.  They brake down nicely and are easy to move.

But I might actually have a location for you, Lurts, if you happen to sell toys.  Someone asked me about toys because I mention toys on my business cards (I made them while I was still planning to do toys).  Its a full-service car wash with a waiting room.  I placed a gumball machine there and I think it's going to do well.  He said he'd also like a toy vending machine too, moms will be bringing their kids, especially when summer rolls around (I did give him a 25% commission on the gumball machine).

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  • 1 year later...

Hi all,

I know this is an older topic but I have a few thoughts to add. I work in a customer service call center speaking with people all day. We had training that was developed for us and even have special call scripting that I have been playing around with for vending scripting and I thought that some of our scripting rules could be helpful for vending scripting also.

1. Introduce yourself by including "good morning" or "good afternoon" in your greeting, it sounds more professional then just hi or hello. Personally I say "Hi, good morning"

2. I agree with Rob that you need to use the owner/manager's name, but I would be careful not to overuse it or it loses its charm. Make sure to use it in the beginning right after you hear it, and at the end when you are closing your pitch. You can also use it in the middle once or twice only if appropriate or fitting to what you are currently talking about. It starts to sound less personal if you overuse their name.

3. If you're having trouble with their name, just ask them politely to pronounce it/repeat it for you. People with funky last names are well aware that their names are hard to pronounce and will cut you slack if you are nice about it. NEVER resort to calling them Sir or Ma'am. While it may go over well in certain demographics or areas, these are less appealing then they used to be. Ma'am makes women feel old, and Sir often offends men who were in the military and not officers (I don't get it, but my brother-in-law who served confirmed it for me).

4. Make sure that you are as specific as possible while avoiding vending jargon. Most people have no experience in the vending industry, and a lot of people haven't completed anything beyond high school or possible some courses at a local college. They're not stupid, and don't need talked down to, but try to use the simplest language possible and then adjust your words if needed to fit the person that you are speaking to.

5. The closing is just as important as everything else you say. If they say no, I'm sure that we all know to say thank you, but also try to provide them with some way of contacting you in the future, or at least offer something. If they say yes, confirm the details with them even if you are placing the machine immediately. This makes sure that everyone is clear on the details and reaffirms the commitment.

6. When they voice an objection (and maybe a thread on objections vendors have gotten would be helpful?), re-voice their objection to let them know that you understand their concern, and then voice your rebuttal. "I understand your concern that you don't have the space for the machine. Blah blah blah". And try to avoid using the words but, however, honestly, we, or no problem. I can go into more detail about why if you want me to. There are specific reasons to avoid using them if at all possible.

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FYI about officers.

In the military, commissioned officers outrank enlisted people and therefore almost always have leadership roles. This does not necessarily mean they are smarter, just that they usually don't do grunt work or much manual labor. It is insulting to call a non commissioned enlisted person a sir because since they do all the grunt work , they in essence, "work for a living", Officers, on the other hand "do not work for a living".

Hope that clears it up a bit.

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  • 6 months later...

Locating is not an easy job...I don't like paying locators but sometimes you just have to. My wife is my favorite locator but not necessarily my best (wah). Does anyone have any GOOD locating tips. I mean real tips that make a difference. Hey man.... we are always going to get "Nos" but 1 yes out of 10 would be excellent.

Thanks

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Locating is not an easy job...I don't like paying locators but sometimes you just have to. My wife is my favorite locator but not necessarily my best (wah). Does anyone have any GOOD locating tips. I mean real tips that make a difference. Hey man.... we are always going to get "Nos" but 1 yes out of 10 would be excellent.

Thanks

Be informal. The last thing the manager of a small business wants to deal with is another "business" or worse a "salesman". If you come off as either, you will get a no. End of story. I typically schedule my locating sessions to be very long. Typically I'll spend 3/4 of the time making small talk with the guy before gradually pushing it to the vending angle. Their kids, their jobs, the weather, sports, local news, and so on. If they "know" you a little better, they are far more likely to use your services. Now, not every business can use the low and slow technique, and then I have to improvise. But in my entire vending career, I've only had this technique fail once, and that was because they had an exclusive contract. Good luck pracktikle1!

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Locating is not an easy job...I don't like paying locators but sometimes you just have to. My wife is my favorite locator but not necessarily my best (wah). Does anyone have any GOOD locating tips. I mean real tips that make a difference. Hey man.... we are always going to get "Nos" but 1 yes out of 10 would be excellent.

Thanks

practice

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Wow! I'm just getting started in my vending business and sure do appreciate all the good ideas here. ;D

I went out yesterday and asked for my first location, of course the guy said no. :wacko:

It was a small car wash-did'nt think he would say yes, but I asked anyway.

I must say- it does take courage to approach someone...I bet it does get easier tho'. I will find out.

Thanks for all the advice!

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  • 1 month later...

Folks,

In an attempt to compile the best possible locator script we can, let's all share what we have and try to put together the best of the best. My people use get this:

Hello, is the owner or manager in?”

If no: “Do you know when he or she will be back and their name?”

If yes: “Hi, I’m ___________ with Kandy King Vending. The South Florida affiliate of The National Children’s Cancer Society. We would like to place a free (Machine type) candy machine in your business to help support the children with cancer. Machines like these generate over $500,000 annually to help children with cancer and their families. ”

If no: “I understand your concerns but do me a favor, let me place the machine here for a week and if you are anything less than thrilled, then I will come and remove it the first day you call”

If yes: Great! Thank you so much for helping out. Which are your favorite candies? We have:

Peanut M&M’s

Regular M&M’s

Skittles

Mike & Ike’s

Hot Tamales

Jelly Beans

Reese’s Pieces

I then have my people fill out the New Client Information Sheet

INFORMATION SHEET

Machine Type:

Business Name:

Phone:

Complete Address:

Contact Name:

Contact Position: (manager etc)

Best day and time to drop machine:

Type of candy requested if any:

Peanut M&M’s Mike & Ike’s Hot Tamales

Regular M&M’s Jelly Beans Reese’s Pieces

Skittles

NOTES:

Thank you again, when someone comes to drop the machine, they will present you will a certificate of appreciation from The National Children’s Cancer Society.

We really appreciate it, thanks again!

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My 2 cents, take them for what they are worth.

Hello, is the owner or manager in?

  • I would use a more uplifting intro like Good Morning/Good Afternoon/Good Evening to start off the conversation in a positive way.
  • I would also say something like Good Morning, This is [First] [Last], is the owner or manager in? With the mention of name you make the call less anonymous and if it is an employee they would be more inclined to push the call through to the person you're looking for. If it is the decision maker you will not have to re-introduce yourself in the next part.

If yes: “Hi, I’m ___________ with Kandy King Vending. The South Florida affiliate of The National Children’s Cancer Society. We would like to place a free (Machine type) candy machine in your business to help support the children with cancer. Machines like these generate over $500,000 annually to help children with cancer and their families. ”

  • I would take out "Hi, I’m ___________ with Kandy King Vending." Sounds to much like the intro to a sales call and it sets the tone you area business, not a charity affiliate. I would never lie to a location but I try and make my charity affiliation the main focal point of the pitch. I normally don't give them my business name until I am handing them my business card to call if the gum runs out or they need something.
  • Please take the "the" out of " the children with cancer" if you leave it the way you have it. The makes it sound like they are a separate group like the blacks, the crackers, the Mexicans...
  • Reverse the second sentence to something like "We would appreciate it if you could support the children fighting cancer by placing a free charity (machine type) small candy machine in your business. This take the focal point and places it on the good they are doing and less on what they need to give up to do it.
  • Always work into your pitch it being a small machine or only takes up about a foot and a half of space, unless it's a bigger machine. makes the sacrifice in floor space seem small and more appealing to them. You can always upgrade them later or go ahead and mention you have larger models if they prefer (I like to always lead them where I want them to go)
  • Leave a raw number out of it, you say $500,000 dollars to me and in a way that means I am part of it, you better bet I am going to start thinking how I could capitalize on that myself. Just tell them that thanks to small business owners just like them NCCS is able to help hundreds of children and their families battle cancer.

If no: “I understand your concerns but do me a favor, let me place the machine here for a week and if you are anything less than thrilled, then I will come and remove it the first day you call”

  • Good job trying to close it even if you get a NO but instead of say "let me place the machine here for a week" I would say "would you be willing to do a week long trial with no obligations" You want them to do it because they think it will be painless, we are trained by marketers to see value in "trials" - my second career is in marketing, web marketing but marketing.

If yes: Great! Thank you so much for helping out. Which are your favorite candies? We have:

Peanut M&M’s

Regular M&M’s

Skittles

Mike & Ike’s

Hot Tamales

Jelly Beans

Reese’s Pieces

  • Once you have the yes, don't confuse them by making them choose, plus you know your business and your COG's. Use the products you want when you install but let them know, after it's installed you can get other choices if they prefer when you service next time. That way if they have a good suggestion, like they know an employee LOVES Reeses Pieces, then you can make the switch then if you have them with you, or for real on the next service. If they say yes we want "" and its something you don't see as a good seller, they will normally have forgotten about it by the next service date.

I then have my people fill out the New Client Information Sheet

INFORMATION SHEET

Machine Type:

Business Name:

Phone:

Complete Address:

Contact Name:

Contact Position: (manager etc)

Best day and time to drop machine:

Type of candy requested if any:

Peanut M&M’s Mike & Ike’s Hot Tamales

Regular M&M’s Jelly Beans Reese’s Pieces

Skittles

NOTES:

Thank you again, when someone comes to drop the machine, they will present you will a certificate of appreciation from The National Children’s Cancer Society.

We really appreciate it, thanks again!

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Kandy king,

Way ahead of you buddy. Check this thread out...

http://www.vendiscuss.net/index.php?/topic/4440-Locating:-Scripts,-Objections,-Rebuttals,-Success.

Sent using Tapatalk 2

In an effort to keep all this good information together, I've merged these two threads.

Sent using Tapatalk 2

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  • 3 months later...

I am new to locating and am wondering what are some good strategies to use when out "free-styling," as the American Pickers call it. I started out pretty well. On my first attempt I placed 3 machines in one hour.. but here lately I'm having a hard time deciding which kinds of businesses are worthwhile attempts and likely to be successful. I studied the scripts again and feel like I'm saying the right things, but clearly something needs to get better.. thanks for any support, encouragement, or tips you can throw my way!

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I am new to locating and am wondering what are some good strategies to use when out "free-styling," as the American Pickers call it. I started out pretty well. On my first attempt I placed 3 machines in one hour.. but here lately I'm having a hard time deciding which kinds of businesses are worthwhile attempts and likely to be successful. I studied the scripts again and feel like I'm saying the right things, but clearly something needs to get better.. thanks for any support, encouragement, or tips you can throw my way!

what kind of machines u trying to locate

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 months later...

hey guys i started a similar thread to this one but I'm not getting many responses. Im looking for exactly what everyone is posting on this thread but for snack and soda machines. because the pitches and scripts I'm assuming are going to have to be different because many places that would be good locations for full line machines will have to be done over the phone with the corporate offices and there is also no charities involved usually. any help on a script or a pitch would be amazing! not placing these machines is driving me crazy and i have zero faith or the finances for a locator! thank you from the bottom of my heart in advance! :)

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