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Compressor question


Magiccity726
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I have a bunch of compressors that go to DN 501e & 276e’s. I know that some of them just need more gas/Freon (not sure what it’s called). Anyways, I’m going to bring a few in to be repaired. Is there a way that I can tell if they are just out of gas? Also, how much to people typically charge to repair them or fill them up with gas? I don’t want to trade them in for refurbished units or buy new compressors. I’m looking for a cheaper option. Thanks!

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recharge would run about $60 to $85, repair would run about $200 and up, id trade them in for refurbished units, those will run a while before they break down again, which is where you are now with your current units

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15 minutes ago, cvending said:

If they needed to be recharged, they have a leak. Freon does not evaporate.  Depending on the size of the leak, a recharge could last from a few weeks to a year or more.

So the Freon lasts forever? Can a leak be fixed? So when a compressor doesn’t cool what do you do to fix it besides trading it for a refurbished unit?

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You'll need to diagnose the issue to know what the issue is.

Evap frosts up? if it isn't a cabinet air leak or a bad evap fan then it's most likely low refrigerant. For small leaks just have a tech throw some more R134a in and see how fast it leaks out. For large leaks, it has to be repaired. Also if deck serial ends in (I think) U, V or W it may have factory evaporator leaks/ pinholes.

Compressor doesn't start? Throw a hard start kit on there, if it still doesn't start the compressor is trash, get an exchange unit.

But before sending units in make sure all fans are running, there are no air leaks, and throw a hard start kit on because they are super cheap. A good amount of issues are caused by one of the three.

 

 

Edited by orsd
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Also make sure that the thing has power, and that the thermostat works or is trying to start (clicks) before you write off the compressor and send it in.

A bad thermostat is easy to diagnose, turn it to the warmest setting and compressor should turn off, turn it to the coldest setting and compressor should turn on (if it clicks but doesn't start see above regarding compressors.

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4 minutes ago, orsd said:

Also make sure that the thing has power, and that the thermostat works or is trying to start (clicks) before you write off the compressor and send it in.

A bad thermostat is easy to diagnose, turn it to the warmest setting and compressor should turn off, turn it to the coldest setting and compressor should turn on (if it clicks but doesn't start see above regarding compressors.

Yes I know how thermostats work. The compressors are not cooling and I was just wondering if there was a way to tell if it just needs refrigerant. I have like 40 that do not cool

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There is a difference between compressors and cooling decks.

The deck includes all components except the evap fans, which are mounted to the cabinet.

It consists of the compressor (black dome), condensor (bottom set of coils), condenser fan (blows air thru condensor), evaporator (upper coils, the ones tucked behind the delivery chute), start component (small cylinder with wires near compressor), cap tube (thin copper tube), accumulator (copper bulb near evaporator) and various copper lines.

Now in order to see if the compressor is bad, see my post above, basically if the compressor clicks but doesn't start it is bad, but some compressors can be coaxed back to life with a 3 in one (basically fresh/heavier duty start components).

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The simple rule I follow is this... adding a new hard-start to the compressor only buys you time.  A clicking compressor usually means it's going bad and it just needs more juice than the current starter can handle.  It is definitely cheaper to buy a new hard start kit than to buy a new cooling deck, and it's not worth your time or money to pay someone to put ONE compressor on a cooling deck as it can be about the same price to buy an entirely new cooling deck... but the trick to buying time with the hard start kit is to put it on yourself.  I haven't done it, but I guess the thing is that you have to make sure you absolutely have it wired right.

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Jesus H Chr#$t.  Why would you sit on 40 or more compressors and then try to remember what was wrong with them?  The questions you're asking require symptoms of problems to answer for each and every one.  The only thing that can be done now for any that start and still run is to try recharging them and see if they hold the freon, or to evacuate them, see if they hold a vacuum and then recharge them.  You'll have to do that just to see how good the valves are in the compressors.  The ones that don't start need to be rebuilt with a new compressor, filter/drier, freon and a fan motor if you're smart.  None of these repairs should be done unless you are in need of a working unit now.  Otherwise you risk that a microscopic leak will cost you all the freon you put in one that you then let sit around unused.  I have shelves of core units but none have good compressors on them so I at least know that and can rebuild them when needed for a repair.  No guesswork there.

Edited by AZVendor
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8 hours ago, AZVendor said:

Jesus H Chr#$t.  Why would you sit on 40 or more compressors and then try to remember what was wrong with them?  The questions you're asking require symptoms of problems to answer for each and every one.  The only thing that can be done now for any that start and still run is to try recharging them and see if they hold the freon, or to evacuate them, see if they hold a vacuum and then recharge them.  You'll have to do that just to see how good the valves are in the compressors.  The ones that don't start need to be rebuilt with a new compressor, filter/drier, freon and a fan motor if you're smart.  None of these repairs should be done unless you are in need of a working unit now.  Otherwise you risk that a microscopic leak will cost you all the freon you put in one that you then let sit around unused.  I have shelves of core units but none have good compressors on them so I at least know that and can rebuild them when needed for a repair.  No guesswork there.

They are all marked. Thanks

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